Posts Tagged ‘documentary’

Women in a field | Countryside Karnataka

June 1, 2014

women working in a field

women working in a field
Women working in a field.

Photographed in Karnataka in July 2011.

Layap Woman | Street Style Bhutan

March 16, 2014

street fashion bhutan

Layap Woman. The Layap are indigenous people inhabiting the high mountains of northwest Bhutan.

“The dress of the Layap women consists of yak wool garments with a distinctive conical pointed hat (that is unique to Laya). The hat is the same hat in which they were banished from Tibet in the 15th century and they continue to wear it to this day. If they fail to wear the hat they believe they will upset the village spirits.”

Photographed at the Punakha festival in Punakha, Bhutan.

Bhutanese Woman | Street Style Bhutan

March 14, 2014

street style thimphu bhutan

street style thimphu bhutan
75 year old Bhutanese woman. 

Wearing Wonju and Kira – the national dress for women in Bhutan.

Photographed after her prayers outside the Chorten in Thimphu, Bhutan.

Everyday Wear | Street Style Bhutan

March 9, 2014

bhutan street fashion

bhutan street fashion
Bhutanese man in Gho – the national dress for men in Bhutan.

Photographed outside the Chorten in Thimphu, Bhutan.

Working Class | Street Style Bhutan

March 7, 2014

bhutan street fashion
Bhutanese woman.

Photographed on Norzin Lam Street in Thimphu, Bhutan.

Arts Student | Street Style Aizawl

March 1, 2014

street fashion mizoram india

street fashion mizoram india
A 17 year old Mizo boy. Arts student. Lives in Aizawl.

Photographed in February 2013 at the New Market, Aizawl.

Shopkeeper | Street Style Aizawl

March 1, 2014

street fashion aizawl

street fashion aizawl
A 40 year old Mizo shopkeeper. Lives in Aizawl.

Photographed in February 2013 at the shoe market (Foreign Lane) near New Market, Aizawl.

Young Khasi Boy

February 26, 2014

Street style shillong india

David. About 3 years old. Likes to play with toy cars. Doesn’t mind being photographed. Favourite song: David is a monkey.

Photographed in Lachumiere, Shillong.

Samten

January 15, 2014

dharamsala street fashion india
Samten, 31. Tibetan. Works as a photographer. Lives in McLeodGanj, Dharamsala.

How long have you been living here and what did you do before working as a photographer?
I came here in 2004. I worked at coffee shops, restaurants. In total around 7-8 places.

What kind of photography you’re interested in?
Nothing in particular. It’s free. For example I like this cup, I have some feeling, I take a photo.

Do you have any favourite books?
I like reading Chinese & Buddhist philosophy. I just started reading this book about a traveller who came to Beijing, then inner Mongolia via Xinghai then Lhasa and what he saw how everything was about 200 years ago. It’s in Chinese. I don’t know how to translate the name. // I think it’s Young Husband.

Favourite films?
Weeping camel. Amelie. YesterdayIn the Heat of the Sun.

Is there anything you find interesting about Buddhist philosophy?
The Buddha talk.  // Dhammapada

Does your name mean anything?
Samten means if I go this way I’m never coming back. If I am thinking something, I decide to do something, I will do it.

Do you believe in reincarnation?
Yes yes yes. I think it’s true. When we die we just change bodies. Yes.

Photographed and interviewed in Mcleodganj in November 2013.

Kuku

December 25, 2013

kuvelu tetseo nagaland street style

kuvelu tetseo kohima street style
Kuvelu Tetseo, 22. Chakhesang NagaMusician/Sociology student. Likes Full house, fairytale animation, Dzukou valley, Kerti’s blog, and Naga food. Lives in Kohima.

What do you have in your wardrobe?
Lot of whites. Lot of dresses. Lot of fur.

Favourite designers
Keds Krome, Aneeth Arora, Rahul Mishra, Karl Lagerfeld…

What are you listening to on repeat?
The Way I am  by Ingrid Michaelson.

How do you spend your days in Kohima?
I blog when I am free. I like cleaning stuff. Mopping. Watering the flowers. Helping mom. Most of my time is spent cleaning stuff.

Anything you’re obsessed with?
Fur. And cleaning.

Interviewed and photographed in Kohima in December 2012.

The Hills Are Alive / Elle Dec ’13

December 22, 2013

street style shillong

The Northeast* people were exposed to European and American culture through Christian missionaries long before they came into contact with Indian culture. They also don’t look like other “Indians”, so their choices in terms of whom they want to emulate fashion-wise are different to the rest of the country. Most people say their inspirations are K-pop, Korean and western films (which is all very recent — 10 to 15 years — since cable TV came and they gained access to Korean channels) but before that, foreign magazines were easily available as they are on the border and brands like Converse and Levi’s have been around forever.

Some people say they got interested in fashion because their moms and aunts were into it. They always watched beauty pageants, recycled and stitched their own clothes (taking inspiration from magazines) and played dress up at home. Some say many beautiful people surround them and so their habits and interests get rubbed off onto them.

A lot of young people don’t list their fashion inspirations actually and one could say that they’re individually more liberal, have various inspirations, and are not afraid to experiment with clothes and the way they look.

*pardon my generalization
—-

The article below was published in ELLE India December 2013 issue. If you have something to add/agree/disagree, leave a comment below.

nagaland shillong street style india

nagaland shillong street style india

From wearing music on their sleeve to scouring flea markets for that standout piece — style (with all its layers) is the very essence of the North-east

‘Mumbai pretends not to care as it flaunts a mix of street, high-street and luxury fashion, while Delhi takes its designer labels very seriously. But both ‘fashion capitals’ put together aren’t a patch on the innate style emerging from North-east India. The unexplored states are the real style stars. We take a look at the influences that have shaped this sartorial sensibility.

HI, HALLYU
With an affinity for South- east Asian fashion, the greatest style influence in the North-east is the Korean wave (also known as Hallyu). Faced with a blanket ban on Hindi movies and satellite channels, young people turned to Korean cable channels like Arirang TV and KBS. “South Korea has taken over completely,” says star Mizo stylist Edward Lalrempuia of the strong pull K-Pop culture. With pop stars like Big Bang, 2PM and Girls’ Generation rising up the charts, we have to agree.
Dressing like their icons is easy. “Imitations of the Korean style is apparent in some states, thanks to the availability of these styles in their local shopping markets, which are still going strong without Zaras and Mangos,” claims Sikkimese blogger and Economics student Rinchen Ongmu. The reigning Hallyu trends at the moment? Dyed hair, ’90s hip-hop- influenced sportswear, coloured skinnies and tyre-soled creepers.

SOUL MUSIC 
Musical stars Lou Majaw, blues band Soulmate, indie girl band The Vinyl Records and a host of metal rock bands keep music running through their veins. “The previous generations, our parents in particular, have always been influenced by music and the culture associated with it, from Janis Joplin and Bob Dylan to ’70s disco,” says Rinyaokhan Jajo, a stylist and creative consultant from Manipur. North- easterners don’t just dress like their musical heroes; they imbibe the very essence of the music they listen to. So you’ll find emo hairstyles, drop- crotch pants, band T-shirts and even tattoos, all casually layered.

CHURCH VS STATE 
Wearing your Sunday best takes on a whole new meaning; there are multiple high-fashion moments at the pews. “There are so many women who grew up going for their Sunday Church services and learnt how to carry off a simple dress at an early age,” says Assam-born Dolly Haorambam, assistant designer at Bodice.
To an untrained eye, it may also seem that socio-economic differences, usually simple enough to point out by attire in most places around the country, are less marked in the North-east. “I’ve interacted with people from all levels of society on my travels, and they’ve told me that they would spend their last rupee on clothes rather than food,” reveals blogger and photographer Manou, of his travels to Shillong, Dimapur, Kohima and Aizawl. You’ll find flea markets spilling over with merchandise priced as low as ` 50, teeming with people looking for a great bargain. This profound interest in fashion may well be because there is an encouraging foundation here to develop your own sartorial voice. As Arunachali fashion blogger Renee Nabam puts it, “Most of us don’t have first-hand knowledge of fashion, but we are very aware of our style. Plus, we’re not restricted to ethnic wear; perhaps we are simply braver when it comes to expressing ourselves through what we wear.”’

— by Nidhi Jacob
Photos taken by me in Kohima/Dimapur/Aizawl/Shillong in 2011/12.

Everyday Kohima

December 15, 2013

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kohima nagaland

nagaland street fashion

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kohima nagaland

kuvelu tetseo tetseo sisters
Kuvelu Tetseo, 23. Musician.

kohima street fashion

kohima street fashion india

December 11 2012. Today, Keds and I hung out on the streets for about six hours. I wanted to document how the town people dress up on a regular day. We met two models. A designer. A blogger. A teacher. A shopkeeper. And a lot of students. Keds was excited about doing this as she works as a fashion designer and felt it’d be a good thing for her to really stand & pay attention to what people are wearing out in thetown. While waiting, we talked about her work, my blog and how/why such a documentation is interesting and important.” // excerpt from my journal

kohima street fashion india
Khriesazo Rhakho, 23. Theology student.

kohima street fashion india
Asang, 28. Social Science teacher.

kohima street fashion india
Joykap, 19. Class 12 commerce student.

kohima street fashion india
Atu, 21. 1st year MA Economics student.

kohima street style

kohima street style
Azi, 14. Class 9 student.

kohima street fashion india
Lezotuonuo, 20. Student.

kohima street fashion india

kohima street fashion india
Nikchunaro. 1st year BA student.

kohima street style
Akum, 25. Shopkeeper.

kohima street fashion india
Vizo, 19.

kohima street fashion
Pauria, 20. 1st year BA student.

street style kohima
Rebecca, 18. 1st year BA student.

street style kohima

street style kohima
Sekuzo Sovenyi, 22. Fashion designer.

street style kohima
Baby Kerhuo, 26. Works at a shipping company in Denmark.

mr nagaland vengitso z puro

kohima street fashion
Vingotso Z Puro, 22. Ex Mr. Nagaland.

kohima street style
Adwalie, 18. Class 11 student.

kohima street style
Thejangulie Nakhro, 20. 2nd year BA student.

kohima street fashion

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Mercy Tetseo, 29. Musician.

kohima street style

kohima street style
Old Naga couple crossing the street.

kohima street fashion india

kohima street style
Street side vegetable vendors.

kohima street fashion india
Church going Naga girls on a Sunday.

kohima street style
Man wearing Naga(Angami) shawl.

kohima street fashion india

kohima street fashion india

kohima street style

kohima street style

kohima street style

kma6

kohima street style

—-
Photos from Kohima, Nagaland taken in December 2012.

Chovi-e Luho

December 9, 2013

street style kohima india
Chovi-e Luho. 23. Management graduate. Lives in Kohima. Belongs to the Angami tribe. Likes Modern Family.

“I look up to my grandma for fashion. She is just an old village lady but has this particular style, when you take it to the fashion level she really has it. She is about 70 years old & lives in Khuzama village.”

Do you like anybody from pop culture?
Lady Gaga.

Where do you hang out in Kohima?
Kisama village. We go there sometimes to just chill and do barbecues.

I’m here for Christmas holidays. Usually we spend Christmas with our family. Have family gatherings. Go to church. Go out for picnics in the outskirts. Go fishing. Best part about the picnics is Galho — a Naga dish made with rice and vegetables.

Does your name mean something?
Chovi means ‘leading to the right destination’ in Tenyidie.

Photographed and interviewed in Kohima in December 2012.

Kusa Khesoh

December 5, 2013

street style kohima nagaland

street style kohima nagaland
Kusa Khesoh, 22years old. Literature student. Lives in Kohima.

“I grew up in Phek district. I was there for 19 years then I moved here.

What I like about Kohima is shopping and an independent life. Every now and then I earn by working backstage for some designers. Most times I eat out at Big Bite or Ozone cafe. Sometimes I skip dinner and sometimes I have noodles and go to bed. It’s easy for me to live alone. Kohima is different from any other city. I am planning to move to Delhi next year to do my MA. If I don’t do my MA, I’ll probably work at a call centre. Otherwise, I’m interested in working as a stylist.

Alexander McQueen inspires me. I love his collections. In terms of attitude and appearance maybe Lady Gaga. I also love Rachel Zoe, Nidhi Jacob, & Anaita Shroff.

I spend my days taking photos for my blog and my lookbook. I love collecting vintage photos and clothes from uncles and aunts and like going to the thrift shops. I have a lot of bags, all from the streets. And vintage glasses. Thrift shops are at every corner in Kohima town. Best places for shopping are Sekho complex & open market at BOC junction.

I love Bon Iver, Morissey, Mumford & Sons, Laleh, The head and the heart. My favourite songs are Flume by Bon Iver & Some Die Young by Laleh.

The only thing I don’t like about Kohima is that it’s too cold.”

Photographed and interviewed in Kohima in December 2012

Mercy Tetseo

November 27, 2013

mercy tetseo nagaland streets style
Mercy Tetseo. Has read Odd thomas about 7 times.  One of the Tetseo Sisters. 2nd runner up Miss Nagaland 1999. Has a degree in psychology. Lives in Kohima & Delhi.

Childhood.
There was just forest around everywhere and a very few houses. A bunch of us 6-7 kids would go on fake hunting expeditions and picnics — take biscuits and fill flasks with tea and walk and walk. This was on saturdays. Sundays were about church and sunday school where teachers will tell us stories from the bible and play some bible games & watch some christian films. Much more fun than the church now.

In our old house at Dr Billy Graham road, it was like literally living in the forest. We were the second family to move in there. Only traffic was people going to work in the fields in the mornings and evenings. When we were kids we would hang out by the gate and old ladies would give us pumpkins. My mom loves gardening so half of our land was a kitchen garden. We had 4 pigs, guava trees, mulberry, pears, peaches, passion fruit. My mom and dad grew them. Our house was a typical tin roof house with a big Naga style kitchen with a fireplace in the middle and two rooms. We used to grow our own vegetables — pretty much everything. And there was a huge tank for storing rain water that’s where two of our cats drowned unfortunately. We lived there for a year till we moved to a concrete house behind it. The garden remained till we eventually sold everything off and moved to our present house.

We used to have a lot of fun fetching water from the well and rivers. My parents used to find water sources and dig wells. We’d have competition amongst us siblings how many pots of water one could fetch in a day. We would also catch fish. I remember an old man would announce no women folk could fetch water for two days and that meant the annual Angami festival(Sekrenyi) was on. This is when a woman is not supposed to cross a man’s path. Same for men. Ah so between Azi, I, and my brother, Azi used to win. She’d fetch about 5-7  pots.

Do you have a favourite memory from your childhood? Running back home through the forests, through sun, through some scary parts, through shade, anticipating what would be there for snacks. Momos, chow, cakes, jalebis, or samosas. Sometimes mom would be there, sometimes not. We would make tea and play guess what mom would bring from school. Momos were the best.

Has the town changed a lot since you were a kid? Yes. Old small quaint cottages have been replaced by ugly buildings. Roads are better but have become smaller. Many of the ponds we played in have dried up or some people filled them up and built houses on them. All our childhood playgrounds are gone. The trees we used to climb are gone. A small stream used to run through the colony — there is a road there now. All bamboo grooves are gone. Ahh entire landscape has changed.

How did you get interested in fashion?
My mom, me, Azi, all my cousins, my nanny — we would religiously follow all beauty pageants. There were always lot of clothes in our house as there were 3 older female cousins in our house and my mom was very creative about recycling clothes. She’d buy stuff for them and then alter the clothes so I’d get to wear them too. We were always discussing shoes and clothes. Dressing up was like a game for all of us. We all used to play songs on the radio and dance. I was in love with flowy skirts. I think I had a cut out of Audrey Hepburn in a black dress. I used to pester mom to make short fitted dresses but she’d only make full length ones.

My dad used to have a great collection of old fashion, film, music magazines — both Indian & Western. There was Options, Seventeen, Glamour, lots of Chinese & Russian film magazines. We used to cut out pictures and make scrap books out of them and take them to school to share with friends. Mom used to copy ideas from these magazines & make clothes for us.  My dad was the first person in our village to have a camera. He had a Yashica. Azi hated being photographed when she was a kid till she finished school. My dad used to photograph me a lot. Mom would scold us if anybody was looking down in a photo as it was considered a bad photo so we would always look straight into the camera.

Are there any films you like in particular because of their fashion? Breakfast at Tiffany. I like what Marion Cotillard wears in A Good Year. Kate Beckinsale’s body suits in Underworld. The Help — most of the characters wear really pretty stuff.

How was living in Delhi for you?
I went to Delhi first when I was 19. I was in awe of all the cars, the lights at night, the shopping malls, and the traffic was overwhelming. When I moved there, first few months were terrible. Heat was bad and people were rude. But you get used to it because you become less sensitive. Everything seemed fast– exciting but scary. For me cooking for myself was fun. There was a lot of freedom because there was no routine. Suddenly it seemed like I had more time. Days started early and would stretch till late. While back in Kohima, town would shut by 3 or something and we’d sleep by 8.

What did you miss most when you were in Delhi?
Fresh air, food, and open spaces. You have parks but not forests where you can scream.

Anything you’re listening to over and over again?
My playlist hasn’t changed much for a while but I’ve been listening to a lot of Katie Melua and also What It Feels For a Girl by Madonna because I am practicing it. 


Photographed & interviewed in Kohima in December 2012.

19 People

November 4, 2013

street style india

Arya john street style india

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gauri verma street style india

vibhash sharma street style india

carol humtsoe james lalthanzuala street style india

arushi parakh street style india

kiran jaisinghani street style india

anchal sukhija india fashion week

ekta rajani street style india

chinki sinha india fashion week

suket dhir street style india

cherry sharma street style india

stephen lotha carol humtsoe street style india

street style india

pranav kirti misra street style india

I made a list.

Photos from Delhi Fashion Week in 2012/2013.

Kalpana

October 30, 2013

street style delhi

“One of my least favorite quotes, or outlooks on life has always been ‘go with the flow.’ I must admit, I’m hardly the most laid back person. In fact, many would attest to the fact that I’m a bit high strung, but I’ve never understood why you would want to give yourself so little power in your own life. Go With the Flow implies that you should allow yourself to be acted upon, whether you like the result or not. It’s an outlook I hate, but it’s one that I find myself slipping into this year as a senior. With the amount of work that all of us have its easy to let go of things and forget that you have a say in the matter. You can react, you are a human being who is in capable of thought and action. Remember to react.”

Kalpana. High school student/fashion blogger. Loves lists. Likes The Kooks. Blogs here.

Photographed in Hauz Khas Village, Delhi in 2012.

Sonam Bhutia

October 25, 2013

street style delhi india

street style delhi india
Sonam Bhutia, 37. Half Tibetan Half Nepali. Born and brought up in Kalimpong. Lives in Delhi.

“I love vintage and off beat fashion. I am a street shopper and Sarojini Nagar is my favourite haunt. The tunic I’m wearing is from Sarojini, blouse is from some export house, and the brooch is vintage.”

What’s the best thing about Kalimpong?
One doesn’t need a cab or anything to go anywhere. You can walk and reach everywhere. I miss the quaint streets and greenery. Also kachar pachar — street food which you can’t find anywhere else.

How long have you been in Delhi? You think you’ve adjusted well to living here?
Ya, I think so. I feel more at home here. I came to Delhi when I was 21 so about 15 years now.

What kind of jobs have you done so far?
I worked in a restaurant as a hostess when I first came to Delhi, then  I worked with a TV production company where I was handling production and costumes for shows, and now I work in PR.

What kind of music do you like?
I’ve been listening to Lifehouse all of this week; actually it’s been almost 10 years and I still love them. I like Amy Winehouse. And of late, been listening to a lot of Ray Charles.

Anything on repeat?
I got you under my skin by Sinatra.

Photographed at Safdarjung Enclave, New Delhi.

We Need To Talk About Northeast India

July 6, 2013

street style woman aizawl india

Looking for potential contributors.

If you have a story, illustration, photograph, selfies(hate that word), poem, map, or anything having to do with people, culture(way of living/social habits/fashion) from the Northeast, please get in touch. My email is: wearabout at gmail dot com. (The material should be your own and not published anywhere else.) Please use the subject line**: ezine/wearabout

These are a few photos from my trip for your reference.

woman street shillong

house in meghalaya india

house in meghalaya india

kuvelu tetseo sisters nagaland

fashion dimapur india

dimapur wednesday market

impur india

house in ungma nagaland

miss nagaland imlibenla

mokokchung town

aizawl street market

aizawl street market

aizawl street india

aizawl girls street style

aizawl city full moon india

Photos from Aizawl, some parts of Nagaland, and Shillong.

PS. If you have any questions, thoughts, or ideas, send me an email or write in the comment section below.

Women + working class | India Fashion Week

July 3, 2013

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workers7-2 workers7-1

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I’ve tried to put together the urban Indian crowd that attends fashion weeks(look at Bombay here). It’s a small filtered out crowd.

I’m sometimes asked about the trends I see in India. I can’t point at one thing and say this is happening. Can anybody? India is too vast and diverse. It looks like a lot is happening simultaneously within a small crowd. Colour blocking. Traditional/vintage mixed with new. Prints mixed with colours. Tailored. Structured. Asymmetry. Lot of customization and personalization.

You see a lot of people endorsing the designers they like. Borrowed for the day, gifted, or bought. (Lesly Lobeni in Varun Sardana. Karuna Laungani in Rahul Mishra. Sabina Halder in Abdul Halder. Ridhima Sud in Pia Pauro. Ruhi Sheikh in Bodice).

Designers wearing the clothes they make. (Arya John, Ruchika SachdevaHiroko Takahashi.) There is Sarojini stuff combined with online stores. Old hand-me-downs(Carol Humtsoe). Vintage(Monica) Head to toe luxury(Pooja Khurana in Dior+Karen Miller). Models are usually in loose casual clothes and flat shoes. (A bit of generalization.)

working class indian fashion

Another thing you can’t help notice is the working class people at fashion weeks. You see them around on all days but start finding them in abundance on the last day as they start dismantling stages and stalls. It’s interesting to see how they mix with the fashion crowd. They move in lines. Mostly looking down. In & out of the same areas as everyone else – the smoking area, by the party lounges, the designers’ stalls, backstage. Through loud music, drunk happy people, media spotlight, celebrities. They don’t talk at all. Even when they are together they don’t seem to be talking much. Like they were told not to.

However, I didn’t photograph them just to show the contrast between the classes. Guess everybody knows it exists pretty much everywhere in India. I like their aesthetics.

working class indian fashion

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All photos from 2011-2012 WIFW in Delhi.